Photograph Album -
The Carnegie Science Center

Internet Web Site Master Index for the History of
The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science, Pittsburgh

The newest museum to bear the Carnegie name, The Carnegie Science Center, opened to the public on October 5, 1991. It is the successor to The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science which opened as this country's fifth major planetarium on October 24, 1939. The Carnegie Science Center is located on Pittsburgh's North Shore near the Pittsburgh Steelers' football stadium; The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science building is located one mile to the northeast, in Allegheny Center.

The Carnegie Science Center includes a new Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium and Observatory, Rangos Omnimax Theater, Miniature Railroad and Village, one million-volt Oudin-type Tesla Coil, Computer Lab, and WPXI-TV 11 Weather Center, as well as a World War II diesel-electric submarine, the U.S.S. Requin(SS-481), moored in the Ohio River next to the Science Center building.

The Carnegie Science Center is also the home to the Pittsburgh Regional Science and Engineering Fair. The third oldest Science Fair in the United States(the oldest regional Science Fair in a major metropolitan area; the two older fairs are state-wide fairs), under the affiliation of Science Service, Inc. which facilitates the International Science and Engineering Fair, it started as the Pittsburgh Regional School Science and Engineering Fair at The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science in 1940. This competition is free to all students in grades 6-12 in public and non-public schools throughout 22 counties within Western Pennsylvania and 3 counties in northern West Virginia. The Science Fair is co-sponsored by Carnegie Mellon University, the Carnegie Science Center, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, University of Pittsburgh, and various foundations, universities, colleges, industries, corporations, and professional societies. -

Photograph 1 shows the main entrance to The Carnegie Science Center. Photograph 2 shows the exterior of the Rangos Omnimax Theater.

Photographs 3, 4, and 5 show scenes from the Science Center's very popular exhibit, The Miniature Railroad and Village[which has been displayed in Pittsburgh(at Buhl or The Carnegie Science Center) for more than forty years]. Photographs 3 and 4 show an historic replica of the Sharon Steel Mill(not a Carnegie Steel or U.S. Steel mill) on the railroad and village platform. The Pullman Palace Car Company was one of Andrew Carnegie's many businesses; photograph 5 shows the original model used to obtain a patent for the Pullman Parlor Car, in 1878.

Photographs 6 through 11 show several long-time Science Center favorites, which began exhibition at The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science. Photograph 6 shows the world globe made by Rand McNally; The Carnegie Museum of Natural History also has a world globe, of the same exact size, which displays the continents a little differently. Photographs 7 and 8 show the Foucault Pendulum; the beautiful brass and marble pendulum pit, displaying the true cardinal points of direction, remains at the Buhl building. Photograph 9 shows the fifth largest meterorite fragment, recovered from Meteor Crater in Arizona.

Photographs 10 and 11 show an historic four-inch refractor telescope(often used during free Saturday evening observing sessions in the Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium and Observatory of The Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh) produced by John Brashear, a well-known Pittburgh astronomer and optician near the end of the nineteenth century. An 11-inch Brashear Refractor Telescope is used for free public star parties of the Nicholas E. Wagman Observatory, operated by the Amateur Astronomers' Association of Pittsburgh.

Photograph 12 shows the U.S.S. Requin(SS-481), World War II diesel-electric submarine, moored in the Ohio River, on the North Shore of Science Park near The Carnegie Science Center.

Photo 1 (1) ***Photo 2 (1) ***Photo 3 (1) ***Photo 4 (1) ***Photo 5 (1) ***Photo 6 (1)

Photo 7 (1) ***Photo 8 (1) ***Photo 9 (1) ***Photo 10 (1) ***Photo 11 (1) ***Photo 12

Carnegie Institute/
Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh

Original Science Center building:
The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science



Photographs with Number (1): Copyright 1999 Lynne S. Comunale, All Rights Reserved.


Carnegie Museums of
Pittsburgh

Internet Web Site Master Index for the History of
The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science, Pittsburgh



Disclaimer Statement: This Internet Web page is not affiliated with the Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium and Observatory,
The Carnegie Science Center, or The Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh/Carnegie Institute.

This Internet, World Wide Web Site administered by Glenn A. Walsh, Life Trustee, Andrew Carnegie Free Library.
Unless otherwise indicated, all web pages in this account are Copyright 1999, Andrew Carnegie Free Library, All Rights Reserved.
Additions and corrections to: andrcarn@alphaclp.clpgh.org

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